Consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic – Part Two

Impact on health

I came to Spain for several reasons: to avoid a cold, wet, windy winter in the UK, recover from cancer treatment and, last but not least, visit my friends Manolo and Ana. The bonus is that they live in Malaga. Perfect.

The plan was to stay here until April this year, when I had an appointment with my consultant in Oxford for a check-up. Then things went crazy and I was instructed to self-isolate for 12 weeks and my ferry trip back to the UK was cancelled by the operator anyway. As it was uncertain when I would be able to return to the UK I decided to ask for a check-up here, in Spain. I started making enquiries in May and I finally managed to see a doctor last week (superficially nothing untoward has been found), and I already have an appointment for an MRI in a week.

I’m very impressed considering that Spain is not doing much better than the UK in dealing with the pandemic. The Spanish health service operates on similar principles to the NHS in the UK. Being in possession of a European Health Insurance Card also smooths the way – I wonder what will happen with that when we actually leave the EU next year?

So the takeaway is that the pandemic, as well as making people sick and unable to work, has a knock-on effect of affecting the health of other people with existing or new illnesses due to limited resources.

Here’s an article from The Guardian giving an idea how serious the problem is in the UK.

As a side note, I am a contributing member of The Guardian because it is one of the few major independent sources of journalism in the country with several award-winning articles, campaigns and journalists.

The Guardian

Stay safe, respect others, watch out for zombies.